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  • RSU is advertising for shoulder fellowship to start in August-September 2019 and begining of 2020
    a post-CCT shoulder fellowship for Two years. please send CV to Prof. Levy's PA Charlotte Bourne and arrange a visit to meet Prof Levy and Mr Sforza. [Read more]
  • For Patients, GPs & Physiotherapies - New!!! NHS Choose & Book
    The Unit at Berkshire Independent Hospital is open for NHS patients through Choose & Book (Extended Choice Network).
    Book online
    or contact the secretaries. [Read more]
  • Excellent clinical results over more than 13 years with the Verso rTSA.
    Very high patient satisfaction and return to full activities including sports. [Read more]
  • The least complications with the Verso shoulder compared with other reverse shoulder systems
    From the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, UK
    S. Robati, M.K. Shahid, J. Allport, A. Ray and G. Sforza
    Bone & Joint Journal 2013, Vol. 95-B Supp. 25-27

    Complication Rates From Three Commonly Used Reverse Polarity Total Shoulder Replacements: A Minimum Two Year Follow-Up Of 64 Cases
     
  • Excellent results with the Verso TSA were published in Italy! 
    A group of oorthopaedic surgeons from northern Italy from Piacenza and Verona published their first few years experience with the stemless reverse TSA - The VERSO. 
    They present Excellent clinical and radiologic results that mirror the results of the designing centre!
    (Read more) [Read more]
  • Applications for the Reading shoulder fellowship
    starting in late 2019 and for 2020
    is now open.
    Please apply by visiting the Unit and sending your CV to Jan Barker
    Visits to the Reading shoulder unit are welcome - Please liaise with Prof. Levy's PA Charlotte Bourne
    [Read more]
  • IDO Isometer Shoulder Muscle Strength Gauge.

    Available to buy online in idorth.com - Innovative Design Orthopaedics - [Read more]
  • Groundbreaking research from the Reading Shoulder Unit by Prof. Ofer Levy and his team regarding Propionibacterium Acnes and shoulder arthritis. 
    Propionibacterium acnes: an underestimated etiology in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis?

    This is a very important article in that it suggests the presence of propionibacterium in previously unoperated shoulders with arthritis and furthermore that 'aseptic' failures of shoulder arthroplasty may, in fact, be related to indolent infections with this slow growing organism.
    Read comments by Dr Frederick A. Matsen III, M.D.
    [Read more]
  • Listen to the BBC Radio4 programme - a day in the operating theatre at the Reading Shoulder Unit at the Royal Berkshire Hospital - Case Notes with Dr Mark Porter on Regional anaesthesia for shoulder surgery [Read more]
  • Art at the Reading Shoulder and Elbow Centre
    Original fine art prints all dealing with human body in different situations by four artists are exhibited in the Reading Shoulder and Elbow centre 

    The prints on display are available to buy, with the artist contributing a donation to research. For more information please contact the secretaries in the unit.

    [Read more]
  • The Verso stemless rTSA is approved in Australia & New Zealand by the TGA.
    and it was launched and in increase use in Australia. 

Guidelines for patients following rotator cuff repair

Introduction


The rotator cuff consists of four muscles and their tendons which surround the ball (humeral head) of the shoulder joint. The muscles fine tune the movements of the shoulder and help keep the ball of the shoulder joint in its socket.

The tendon of the rotator cuff passes through a narrow space between the top of the arm bone and a prominent bone on the shoulder blade (the acromion). The tendon is very vulnerable to being pinched here when the arm is moved especially above the head. Over time this pinching can lead to tears of the tendon, the chances of this increases as we get older.

When repeated tearing occurs, the fabric of the tendon becomes weakened and finally, like the cloth at the knees of old trousers, splits. This leads to pain, which can be severe. Weakness of the shoulder can occur and often clicking and crunching on movement.

Other forms of treatment such as injection and physiotherapy are available but sometimes it is necessary to repair the tendon. How well this does will depend upon the size of the tear. If we think about the trousers again, the bigger the split in the cloth, the more difficult is the repair and the more likely the repair is to tear. Your consultant will have discussed this with you.


The Operation


This is carried out under a general anaesthetic. Either an incision is made over the top of the shoulder, or if suitable the operation is performed through the keyhole. The tendon is repaired by stitching it to the bone. The arm is then placed in a sling.


General guidelines


Pain:
A nerve block is usually used during the surgery. This means that immediately after the operation the shoulder and arm often feel completely numb. This may last for a few hours. After this the shoulder may well be sore and you will be given painkillers to help this whilst in hospital. These can be continued after you are discharged home. Ice packs may also help reduce pain. Wrap crushed ice or frozen peas in a damp, cold cloth and place on the shoulder for up to 15 minutes.

Wearing a Sling:
You will return from theatre wearing a sling. The surgeon/physiotherapist will advise you on how long you are to continue wearing the sling. This is usually for between 3 and 6 weeks depending upon the size of the tear. You will be expected to remove the sling for exercises only. Your physiotherapist will advise you of these.

The Wound:
  • Open repair: there is an incision at the top of the shoulder. The stitch is dissolvable but is usually removed at 3 weeks. Keep the wound dry until it is well healed.
  • Arthroscopic (keyhole) repair: This keyhole operation usually done through two or three 5mm puncture wounds. There will be no stitches only small sticking plaster strips over the wounds. These should be kept dry until healed. This usually takes 5 to 7 days.

Driving:
You will not be able to drive for a minimum of 8 weeks. Your surgeon will confirm when you may begin.

Returning to work:
This will depend upon the size of your tear and your occupation. You will need to discuss this with your surgeon.

Leisure activities:
This will depend upon the size of the tear. Your physiotherapist and surgeon will advise you when it is safe to resume your leisure activities.

Follow up appointments:
An appointment will be made for you to see a physiotherapist after your discharge and you will be seen at The Shoulder Unit at 3 weeks. You will be monitored by a physiotherapist throughout your rehabilitation

Exercises:
You may well be expected to perform the following exercises. Your physiotherapist will teach you the following exercises before you leave hospital, if appropriate:
  1. With your arm in the sling move your hand up and down at the wrist.
  2. With your arm out of the sling bend and straighten the elbow
  3. With your arm in the sling and the elbow bent at your side, turn the hand to face the ceiling and then the ground.

Repeat these exercises four times per day. The number you should perform at each session will be recorded for you by your physiotherapist.

Continue these exercises until otherwise advised by your physiotherapist.

If your wound changes in appearance, weeps fluid or pus or you feel unwell with a high temperature, contact your GP.

If you have a query concerning your exercises contact the physiotherapy department where you are receiving treatment.